Articles published originally by the author on the HIVE platform are published on this blog. You too participate in HIVE!

Custom Search
Humahuaca, carnival, jujuy, festival Andes, mountain, Chile museum, wine, cafayate, valles calchaquies paleontology, Neuquen, Patagonia Nahuel Huapi, Neuquen, national parks rafting, kayaking, sailing, Neuquen gastronomic dictionary, argentina villa la angostura, neuquen el palmar, entre rios, national park Santa Fe, birds, animals, nature
Buenos Aires is one of the cultural capitals of South America, so it is no wonder it is full of amazing art museums.

These mighty institutions are frequented by locals and tourists alike, and host some of the most important exhibitions in Latin America.
A famous Argentine artwork by Antonio Berni


Buenos Aires is synonymous with art


The cultural mix of European and Latin influences has inspired numerous artists to build their own style.

Dozens of museums and art galleries display the work of new and renowned exponents; however, many talents present their works in outdoor spaces, such as streets and parks.

MALBA (Museum of Latin American Art of Buenos Aires Malba).


The MALBA, or the Buenos Aires Museum of Latin American Art, is perhaps the most famous contemporary art museum in the whole country.

Considered on a par with foreign institutions in New York and London, the MALBA’s permanent collection and temporary exhibitions are housed in a slick, modern gallery space, and in the recent past, works by Jeff Koons as well as exhibitions showcasing works by famous Mexican artists Diego Rivera and David Alfaro Siqueiros have graced the halls of the museum.

Culture vultures at the MALBA

They have a huge permanent collection featuring works by many of the art world’s most lauded masters dating back centuries. It has one of the largest collections of art in Latin America, with over 12,000 pieces in the permanent collection.


The museum is notable for its important European art collection from the 19th century, as well as its large collection of works by Argentine artists. Admission is free of charge so there is no excuse not to go!.

Buenos Aires’ Fine Arts Museum.

Facade of the National Museum of Fine Arts

Buenos Aires’ Fine Arts Museum is another important institution in the Argentine capital.

They have a huge permanent collection featuring works by many of the art world’s most lauded masters dating back centuries. It has one of the largest collections of art in Latin America, with over 12,000 pieces in the permanent collection.

Read also: The Museum of Vine and Wine in Cafayate Valley Calchaquíes gives a different attraction.

The museum is notable for its important European art collection from the 19th century, as well as its large collection of works by Argentine artists. Admission is free of charge so there is no excuse not to go!.

Fortabat Collection.

The AMALITA Collection. The Amalia Lacroze de Fortabat Art Collection is a private non-profit institution, open to the public, with a heritage of approximately 250 works.

The building that contains the collection is located next to the northeast end of Dock 4, at Calle Olga Cossettini 141. It was designed by the Uruguayan architect Rafael Viñoly, on almost 7000 m² of total area. It has 4 levels, two large rooms, an Auditorium and a cafeteria.

The main gallery consists of a space that occupies an entire floor of the building, covered by an arched ceiling made of glass and steel, which goes from the upper level to the ground level. The curved steel ribs that shape the roof rise from ground level, ending 15m. higher, leaning on reinforced concrete that runs the length of the construction.

The entrance of light inside the galleries is controlled by a system of fifteen movable parasols, controlled by computers, that regulate the sunlight that enters and are mounted on the exterior of the glass vault. Both the internal structure and the external cladding are made of aluminum.

MACBA.

Today, the museum includes works of the most representative tendencies of international geometry.

Established by the Foundation Aldo Rubino in 2012, based on his collection of contemporary art from Argentina and other countries, specialized in geometric abstraction.

The building with glass façade was designed by the architecture studio Vila Sebastián Arquitectos. The total surface destined to the activities of the museum amounts to 1,600 sqm, with 5 floors connected through a ramp.

Eduardo Sivori Plastic Arts Museum.

Inaugurated in 1938, the Museo de Artes Plásticas Eduardo Sívori is dedicated to Argentine art.

Papyrus_PNG_Clipart_Image-1000x737.png

 
Copyright © 2015 Argentina Photo Gallery
Distributed By Gooyaabi Templates
-->